Read This! Ah Ha!

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One of our favorite, almost wordless books (the only words that appear in the book are: Ah Ha! Aahh! and Ha Ha!). Jeff Mack both writes and illustrates this fun tale of a frog who only wants to relax and its narrow escape from a kid, turtle, alligator, and flamingo. Kids will be amused by how the frog outsmarts them all in the end! The kid in the book is drawn in a gender neutral way and could be read as a boy or a girl depending on what sort of protagonist you are looking for in your house. Warning: this books lends itself to loud, excited reading!

Read This! Ah Ha!

One Weekend, Two Books

I finished two books this weekend, both relating to food.

The first book was Third Helpings by Calvin Trillin, a thin, humorous volume written in the 1980s. I read a selection of Trillin’s writing in American Food Writing and enjoyed it, so I added him to my “to read” list along with quite a few others. His writing reminded of nothing so much as Erma Bombeck, a writer who I had entirely forgotten until I read this book –¬†even though I (embarassingly) read all the books of hers that my library had when I was in junior high. I enjoyed this book, but I think it was good that it is a short one, because his writing becomes rather predictable pretty quickly. I don’t think I need to read any of his other offerings, but this one was just the humorous break I needed for a day or so.

The second book I read this weekend (okay, okay, I finished it Monday morning on the train to work), was Climbing the Mango Trees by Madhur Jaffrey. Jaffrey is a noted actress and cookbook author and this is her memoir of growing up in India. As you might expect, the book contains a lot of discussions of food, but it is also an interesting, personal¬†look at the time surrounding Indian Independence from the eyes of a child. I love memoirs, and I think one of the things that I like about them, in addition to the fact that they are intensely personal, is that they are often self-limiting, dealing only with a certain phase of a person’s life. I think this focus makes the books stronger, and Jaffrey’s restriction of the book to her childhood, certainly does that for me here.

One Weekend, Two Books