Mighty Life List #6: Eat a lobster roll in Maine.

Look at this lobster roll. It is a thing of beauty!

Shockingly for a girl who married a Mainer, I had never had a lobster roll until this past week. Luckily this sad state of affairs has now been corrected by this lovely and delicious lobster roll from the lobster shack at Two Lights in Cape Elizabeth, ME. It was awesome – and I have to say the bread is what makes it. So good.

P.S. The photo is all Jami. She just got a new camera, and I think the photos she is taking now are truly stunning.

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Mighty Life List #6: Eat a lobster roll in Maine.

A Quick Post and a Lament

Business first. A week ago I finished The Last Fish Tale by Mark Kurlansky. It was good – nothing brilliant, but an enjoyable and quick read. I like Kurlansky, even though this is only the second book of his that I’ve ever read. (The first was A Basque History of the World, which I liked even more). But I like that he writes about specific narrow sections of the world, history through a very specific lens. (Two of his other books are Salt: A World History and Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World). I like history a lot, but I especially like looking at it in this very limited way. It’s interesting to me. So, if you, like me, like a quirky view of history, give Kurlansky a try.

And now for the lament… The Last Fish Tale was only the 34th book I’ve read this year. At this rate, I haven’t even read a book a week! This is insane and must be fixed. There are only 14 weeks left in the year, and I need to read 18 more books to get up to the one a week level (which would honestly still be low for me). So, more quick, easy reads are in my future, I think. Alright, enough lamenting, back to reading.

A Quick Post and a Lament

Two Much Delayed Reviews

I finished two books at the beginning of August, but am just now getting around to writing them up: In The Woods by Tana French and The Maytrees by Annie Dillard.

Starting with the first book first, In The Woods is a thriller set in Ireland that deals with two crimes involving children that happen approximately 20 years apart. I can honestly say that it was the most enthralling book that I have read in a long time. Not necessarily the best book, although it was really good, but a book that I didn’t want to put down.  I actually had the thought when I was reading it, that I wished I could call in sick, just so I could finish the book. If you like thrillers (or even if you don’t – Jami is not a big mystery reader and she is having a similar addiction to In The Woods at the moment), I really recommend this one. French has a new book out (The Likeness) with some of the same characters, and I am really looking forward to reading that one as well.

The second book that I read is The Maytrees by Annie Dillard. It was beautifully written, really and truly. It fit in with my recent reading of New England authors. And I just didn’t like it that much. I’m happy I read it, and it made me want to read more of Dillard’s writing, but I just felt somehow distant from the whole story. Still Dillard is a great writer and so I’ll give her another try.

That’s all I’ve read in August so far, which is shocking to me, seeing as the month is almost over! We’ll see if I get through at least one more before the month ends.

Two Much Delayed Reviews

The Country of the Pointed Firs

The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett is the second book I’ve read from DailyLit (which is just one of my absolute favorite things). I picked it because I had never read any of Jewett’s work and she is a Maine author. Since my girlfriend is from Maine (and New Hampshire), I thought I should finally read some of her stuff. (I can relate any aspect of life back to reading!) I’m glad I did. The Country of the Pointed Firs was a totally enjoyable, pleasant read. Nothing too much happens, but you get a great sense of a small, coastal Maine community and the people who inhabit it. Jewett does a great job writing the dialog in a Maine accent as well.  The book reminded me a lot of the Anne of Green Gables books, which I devoured as a kid – not so much because of the plot (like I said, there isn’t much of one), but because of the Northeastern locales.

The Country of the Pointed Firs